The Tea Party favored candidates in the statewide races were swept to victory in yesterday’s runoff.  The grassroots activists turned out the vote for their candidates in stunning numbers.

Dan Forest buried his opponent for Lieutenant Governor, beating him with 68% of the vote.  Dan campaigned tirelessly across the state and had the enthusiasm and endorsement of Tea Party groups from the coast to the mountains.  He will face full-on progressive Democrat Linda Coleman in November.  Ms. Coleman believes we must “hold industry, government and the business community accountable when it comes to natural resource consumption”.  She will advocate for “Clean Green policies” and will ensure “a smooth implementation” of Obamacare.

Mike Causey smacked down Richard Morgan for Insurance Commissioner with 57% of the vote.  Causey also traveled the state from end to end, garnering support from Tea Party groups.   Morgan was a former House Rep. with a bad reputation, even among voters in his own County of Moore.  Causey defeated him there by 2 to 1.   (more…)

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OBX Tea Party believes that the following candidates on the ballot for the July 17 Runoff best represent the Tea Party values of limited government, fiscal responsibility and free markets:

NC House 6:  Mattie Lawson

Lieutenant Governor:  Dan Forest

Insurance Commissioner:  Mike Causey

Secretary of State:  Ed Goodwin

State Superintendent:  John Tedesco

Early voting is underway.  Dare County voters can vote at the Board of Elections, located at 954 Marshall C Collins Drive in Manteo,  from 8:30-5pm Monday through Friday through July 13th and on Saturday, July 14th from 8:30 until noon.  Vote in your home precinct on Tuesday, July 17th from 6:30am until 7pm

Click here here to download the flyer to share with your friends, family, neighbors and co-workers.

Cross-posted from obxteaparty.com


Brace yourself for another round of robo-calls and political junk mail.  The crowded field of Republican candidates has resulted in the need for a runoff election or what’s officially called a second primary.  In North Carolina, a second primary can be requested by a second place finisher if no one person in the race received a plurality of the votes (read the statute here).  With the Republicans coming out of the closet in North Carolina and running for office in unprecedented numbers, there were many races in which voters could not settle on the best candidate, resulting in the potential for a runoff. (more…)